Georgia Unfiltered

Search This Site

27 June 2014

Emory University Releases New Interactive Map Showing the Impact of HIV & AIDS in Metro Atlanta

AIDSVu, a project led by the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in partnership with Gilead Sciences, Inc., released new interactive online maps Friday that show the latest HIV prevalence data for metro Atlanta by ZIP code.

One map, shown below, indicates that most of metro Atlanta's HIV/AIDS cases can be found either in the city center or south of I-20.

The data depicted on the map reflect cases entered through 31 December 2013 and are based on residence at diagnosis as reported in Georgia’s Electronic HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS). Data reflect cases from ZIP codes in Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fulton and Gwinnett Counties. Cases missing ZIP code at diagnosis are excluded from the analysis.



“The ability to locate and visualize where HIV services are most needed is an invaluable weapon in our fight against the HIV epidemic in the United States,” said Patrick S. Sullivan, Ph.D, DVM, Professor of Epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, and the principal researcher for AIDSVu. “These community visualizations not only provide a roadmap for local governments and health departments in establishing testing and treatment centers, but show us nationally those cities that demand greater attention and education around HIV prevention.”

Overall, it is estimated that 33,920 Georgians are living with HIV/AIDS.

AIDSVu shows that HIV disproportionately affects black and Hispanic/Latino Americans, and that these disparities exist in both major metropolitan areas and rural areas.

In Georgia, for example, the rate of black males living with an HIV infection diagnosis is 5.2 times that of white males. The rate of Hispanic/Latino males living with an HIV infection diagnosis is 1.3 times that of white males. The rate of black females living with an HIV infection diagnosis is 12.2 times that of white females. And the rate of Hispanic/Latino females living with an HIV infection diagnosis is 2.8 times that of white females.

The state- and county-level data displayed on AIDSVu were obtained from the CDC and compiled by researchers at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Data on HIV prevalence at the ZIP code and census tract data level were provided directly by state, county and city health departments, depending on the entity responsible for HIV surveillance.

AIDSVu was developed by Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in partnership with Gilead Sciences, Inc. The project is guided by an Advisory Committee and a Technical Advisory Group with representatives from federal agencies, state health departments and non-governmental organizations working in HIV prevention, care and research.