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06 January 2013

Blacks Form Caucus in Democratic Party, Despite Being a Majority of Party Primary Voters

A caucus is defined as a group of individuals who come together to advocate, agitate or lobby on matters of concern to them.

if blacks are ignored, powerless and voiceless to the point where they felt it necessary to form a caucus charged with ensuring their voices were heard in the Georgia Democratic Party organization, then a fraud has been perpetrated on black voters who believe the Democratic Party of Georgia works for them when it really doesn't.

And, in that case, it's time to take our votes and voices elsewhere.


Usually, but not always, caucuses are formed to push an agenda from those in the minority or to push issues regularly ignored by those in power. The Georgia House of Representatives, for example, is home to a Rural Caucus that advocates on behalf of rural issues in a chamber dominated by urban lawmakers.

The United States House of Representatives is home to the Congressional Black Caucus, an organization which aims to "positively influence the course of events affecting African Americans and others with similar interests." Of the 535 Members of Congress, forty-three (0.08%) are black. That is clearly a minority, and one could argue that blacks in Congress need a caucus to advance their agenda. Conversely, there is no Congressional White Caucus due to the fact that whites are a majority in America and a majority in Congress. Very few folks worry about ignoring white issues because whites have most of the seats at the table.

Back here in Georgia, blacks have most of the seats at the table in the Democratic Party. Here in Georgia, blacks are the majority in the Democratic Party.


Data from the Secretary of State's office indicates black voters represented 55.4% of the total number of voters participating in the 5 February 2008 Democratic primary; 48.2% of the total number of voters participating in the 15 July 2008 Democratic primary; and 67.4% of the total number of voters participating in the 20 July 2010 Democratic primary.

I don't think anyone would argue that to win a Georgia Democratic primary, one has to pander to black voters. Blacks are the majority.

Yet, despite being a majority of the Democratic Party in Georgia, someone felt the agenda and issues of black Democrats were being ignored.

If my memory of Democratic Party rules serves correct, it takes the signatures of twenty-five state Democratic committee members AND a two-thirds vote of the entire state Democratic committee (provided a 50% quorum is present) to even form a caucus. All of this had to happen before a black caucus could be formed and recognized by the Democratic Party in Georgia.

Guess what?

There is a black caucus in a political party where blacks make up the majority. It's titled, "African American Caucus of the Democratic Party of Georgia." Howard Franklin is the chairman of this African American caucus. This African American caucus is even recognized on the official website of Georgia Democrats. They even have a Facebook page.

To bring it on home, usually, but not always, caucuses are formed to push an agenda from those in the minority or to push issues regularly ignored by those in power.

Blacks are not the minority. Blacks are the majority in the Democratic Party. Blacks are the ones in power. There should be no worries about black issues being ignored in Georgia's Democratic Party. It would be akin to ignoring yourself unless blacks are ignored in Georgia's Democratic Party; unless blacks have no voice in the Democratic Party; unless blacks have no power in the Democratic Party.

If that's the case; if blacks are ignored, powerless and voiceless to the point where they felt it necessary to form a caucus charged with ensuring their voices were heard in the Georgia Democratic Party organization, then a fraud has been perpetrated on black voters who believe the Democratic Party of Georgia works for them when it really doesn't.

And, in that case, it's time to take our votes and voices elsewhere.