Georgia Unfiltered

Search This Site

23 February 2010

Milton County & The Department of Justice

Monday evening, a commenter carrying the pseudonym of "South Fulton Guy" posed the following question to me concerning the re-creation of historically existing counties, such as the former Campbell and Milton counties:

So Andre are you actually predicting an Obama US Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division with Section five oversight of Georgia will support splitting Fulton into an affluent majority white county and a not so affluent majority black county?

On a final note, I'd point out that race pimps like state Sen. Vincent Fort are the only ones injecting race into a debate over a large, bloated, dysfunctional government being split into smaller government that is closer and more responsive to the people.

Here is my answer:

The question of whether resurrecting Milton County violates the Voting Rights Act centers around two questions.

The first question is this:

"Does the resurrection of Milton County have the effect of discriminating based on race, color, and/or membership in a language minority group?"

That question, in itself, is very subjective. Someone like Vincent Fort would say that re-creating Milton County is discriminatory. However, someone like Jan Jones would say the exact opposite.

The second question, which I believe is even more appropriate to ask, is drawn from the Justice Department's webpage:

"Does the resurrection of Milton County deny or abridge the right to vote on account of race, color, or membership in a language minority group?"

I would say that, contrary to what race pimps may lead people to believe, Milton County does not deny or abridge the right to vote on account of race, color, or membership in a language minority group.

House Resolution 21, the so-called Milton County bill, is a constitutional amendment that would be voted on by every registered Georgia voter regardless of race, color, or membership in a language minority group. If, for example, a group of Asian, Hispanic, or black voters desired to organize against H.R.21, they could do so without any interference from the state.

It seems to me that if the Justice Department failed to give pre-clearance to H.R.21, they would be an activist Justice Department legislating from the bureaucracy.

The Attorney General is not an elected official and neither is any staffer within the Civil Rights Division who might recommend that the Attorney General object to H.R.21 being submitted to the qualified voters of Georgia for their ratification or rejection. Now I ask you, what kind of slippery slope might the Department of Justice be on if they determine that allowing every Georgian --regardless of race, color or membership in a language minority group-- the right to vote on H.R.21 is a violation of the Voting Rights Act.

What kind of slippery slope might the Justice Department be on if they decide that allowing the people to vote on re-creating a "historically existing county which was merged into another county" denies or abridges the right to vote on account of race, color, or membership in a language minority group?

On a final note, I'd point out that race pimps like state Sen. Vincent Fort are the only ones injecting race into a debate over a large, bloated, dysfunctional government being split into smaller government that is closer and more responsive to the people.