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05 May 2016

19% of Atlanta Millennials Still Living at Home with Mom, Zillow Study Says

More millennials, age 24-34, live with their moms than at any time in the last decade, according to Zillow's latest analysis.

21% of millennials in the United States live with their moms -- a number that's been steadily increasing since 2005, when just 13 percent lived with their moms.

In Atlanta, 19.7% of millennials still live with their parents.

U.S. rents are on the rise and incomes have not kept up, especially for young adults, who have faced a sluggish job market over the last decade.

Over the past year, rents have increased almost three percent, while incomes have increased just 1.8 percent. The decision to stay with Mom could be driven by affordability or culture. In general, Hispanic families are more likely to live in multi-generational households, and many of the places with a large share of young adults living with Mom also have large Hispanic communities.

"With today's high rents and lagging income growth, many young people are having trouble setting aside enough money to buy their own home, delaying home ownership," said Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. "Living with their parents may allow young people to continue to do things like continue their education, save enough money for first and last month's rent, or save for a down payment."

The median rent in the U.S. is $1,389 per month. Zillow forecasts rents to increase about 3 percent over the next 12 months to a Zillow Rent Index of $1,426.

Zillow is the leading real estate and rental marketplace dedicated to empowering consumers with data, inspiration and knowledge around the place they call home, and connecting them with the best local professionals who can help. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow's Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. Dr. Gudell and her team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research.



03 May 2016

Chattahoochee Hills Receives Petition to Annex 135 Acres of Land Valued at More Than $1 Million

Governor Deal's approval of House Bill 514, the so-called city of South Fulton bill, launched a countdown clock that hits all zeroes on 1 July 2016.

1 July 2016 marks the date when all annexations in unincorporated south Fulton County must be completed. Any land not annexed by an existing city on or before 1 July 2016 will be included in the proposed boundaries of the new city of South Fulton, and voters in those areas will have an opportunity to say "yay" or "nay" to cityhood this November.

With that 1 July 2016 red letter date in mind, property owners and registered voters are already organizing petition drives to annex out of the proposed city of South Fulton.

Two south Fulton County communities --Loch Lomond and Sandtown-- have requested Atlanta annex them before the July deadline. And now, a third annexation petition has emerged; this time in the rural City of Chattahoochee Hills.

At its 12 April 2016 city council meeting, Chattahoochee Hills elected officials were briefed on a proposed annexation of 135 acres (shown left) along Cascade Palmetto Highway.

The land is valued at $1,480,900, according to Fulton County property records.

Under existing state law, there are two ways for property owners and registered voters to file an annexation petition -- 1.) the 100% method, which requires one-hundred percent of landowners to request annexation; and 2.) the 60% method, which requires sixty percent of landowners and sixty percent of registered voters to request annexation.

Chattahoochee Hills city officials say the 135-acre annexation petition represents approximately 100 acres of the 127 privately-owned acres in the proposed annexation area and 14 of the 20 electors in the area.

The next step for this proposed annexation is approval by the Fulton County Commission, followed by a public hearing in Chattahoochee Hills, and the adoption of an annexation ordinance formally bringing the 135 acres into the city.

01 May 2016

Darnell Brands Fmr. Commissioner's Comeback Bid as "Right Wing Republican" Takeover of Fulton County

Whether intentional or not, Emma Darnell framed the race for the district 6 Fulton County Commission seat as a choice between moving forward with the Democrats or going in reverse with the Republicans.

In a 63-second radio advertisement, Darnell's campaign strongly suggested former Commissioner Bill Edwards' comeback bid is part of a larger Republican conspiracy to takeover Fulton County.

Both Darnell and Edwards are Democrats.

(Former Fulton County Commissioner Bill Edwards, pictured left, is seeking his old job back. But incumbent Emma Darnell suggests, in a new campaign advertisement, that Edwards' comeback bid is a Republican conspiracy to takeover Fulton County. )
"The right wing Republicans are trying to takeover Fulton County government," the Darnell advert says. "They re-drew the district lines, trying to unseat Democratic Commissioner Emma Darnell, hoping to erase all the civil rights gains she fought for over the years. But it didn't work.

"South Fulton and southwest Atlanta voters said no to Jim Crow gerrymandering, and said yes to keeping Commissioner Emma Darnell," the campaign advertisement continues. "But on May 24, you have the power to stop the right wing once and for all by re-electing Democrat Emma Darnell.

"Let them know that we won't go back. That is unless you want the right wing Republicans to turn back the clock," the paid political advertisement concludes.

You can listen to the Darnell campaign ad here.

First elected to the Fulton County Commission in 1992, Emma Darnell has now been in public office for over two decades.

Darnell once served with her primary opponent, Bill Edwards, on the county commission until redistricting forced the two to run against each other. Darnell won her first match-up with Edwards, in 2014, by 378 votes.

29 April 2016

Tritonal Releases New Single, "Rewind," Ahead of 27 May Show at Opera Atlanta

Already making a splash in 2016 with their massive singles “Blackout” and “This Is Love,” Tritonal continues to showcase their unbridled creativity with their latest track “Rewind,” out now on Enhanced.

Built around a sample of a rooster crow, “Rewind” incorporates infectious grooves with innovative production, crafting an energetic anthem perfect for the summer season.



"Rewind" by Tritonal

In the past 18 months, the Tritonal duo of Chad Cisneros and David Reed saw four singles break the top 10 on Billboard's dance charts.

(DJ duo Tritonal returns to Atlanta, 7 May, at Opera nightclub in Midtown.)
Now, armed with a bevy of singles including “Gamma Gamma,” “This Is Love,” “Blackout” and “Untouchable” with Cash Cash, which has received over twenty million streams via Spotify, Tritonal is embarking on their Blackout Tour, a North American run which sees the two performing at noted venues including New City Gas in Montreal and Opera in Atlanta, 27 May.

Tickets for Tritonal's Atlanta show are available on EventBrite, but they are selling fast. Early bird general admission passes are already sold out.

28 April 2016

Governor Deal Signs City of South Fulton Bill, Giving Residents Until 1 July to Complete Annexations

Residents in unincorporated south Fulton County will have another chance to create the city of South Fulton.

But before the November referendum on cityhood takes place, property owners and registered voters who would prefer an existing city to a new city will have an opportunity to annex out of the proposed city of South Fulton.

House Bill 514, the so-called city of South Fulton bill, was signed into law by Governor Nathan Deal (R - Georgia) on 26 April 2016.

The bill takes effect 1 July 2016, and reads, "The boundaries of the City of South Fulton shall include all unincorporated areas of Fulton County, including the Fulton County Industrial District, as such exist on July 1, 2016."

Essentially this means that people who don't want to be in a new city of South Fulton can exercise their right to file petitions with nearby cities, requesting annexation.

Under existing Georgia law, there are two ways for property owners and registered voters to file an annexation petition -- 1.) the 100% method, which requires one-hundred percent of landowners to request annexation; and 2.) the 60% method, which requires sixty percent of landowners and sixty percent of registered voters to request annexation.

Two south Fulton County communities --Loch Lomond and Sandtown-- have requested Atlanta annex them using the 60% method. Both of those annexation requests are currently pending before the Atlanta City Council.

Any land not annexed by 1 July 2016 will be included in the proposed boundaries of the city of South Fulton, and voters in those areas will have an opportunity to say "yay" or "nay" to cityhood.

The November 2016 referendum on cityhood marks the second time residents in unincorporated south Fulton County have voted on the issue. The first cityhood referendum, held in 2007, failed by a margin of 85% - 15%.

Georgia State University Student Falls Prey to Armed Robber Before Final Exams

Final exams start this week, at Georgia State University, as the end of the spring semester draws near for students at the downtown Atlanta college.

Unfortunately, the semester is ending as it began -- with a GSU student becoming a victim of crime.

Georgia State University police issued a campus alert, early Wednesday morning, notifying students and staff of an armed robbery that occurred near campus.

According to the GSU police department, a GSU student reported exiting the 112 Courtland Apartments and was approached by an unknown individual who robbed him of his iPhone and wallet.

The suspect is described as a light skinned black male, approximately 6’2” in height. He was seen getting into a 4 Door White Kia with a temporary tag.

This case is being handled by Atlanta Police Department.

Since the beginning of the spring 2016 semester, Georgia State University has been hit with incidents of crime repeatedly; including two robberies at gunpoint inside the school library. The increase in crime led to the demotion of Georgia State University Police Chief Connie Sampson, as well as stepped up police patrols across the sprawling campus.