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30 September 2016

DNC Chair Donna Brazille Heads to Georgia State University for a Panel on Millennial Voters

Donna Brazile, interim chair of the Democratic National Committee, and Republican strategist Margaret Hoover will discuss Millennial voters, their political impact and issues they face in the 2016 election at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

The event, part of the university's Distinguished Speaker Series, is slated for 11 October 2016 at 3PM. GSU Law Professor Tanya Washington will moderate the panel, focusing on how the generation born between the early 1980s and the mid '90s will influence the U.S. political landscape.

Brazile and Hoover, both CNN contributors, will address the perspectives of the Millennial generation, including issues ranging from economic stability, trade, foreign policy and the effects of Supreme Court decisions on society.

27 September 2016

South Fulton SAT Scores Drop in 2016, Bucking the State Trend

Students across Georgia increased their scores on every section of the traditional SAT in 2016, except in south Fulton County.

Data released by the state Department of Education shows that south Fulton high schools lagged behind the state average.

On the traditional SAT, Georgia’s class of 2016 recorded a mean composite score of 1459 – up nine points since 2015, when the mean score was 1450. Mean scores increased from 490 to 493 for critical reading, 485 to 490 for math and 475 to 476 for writing.

South Fulton's five high schools averaged 1164, down 82 points from 2015. The average south Fulton SAT score for critical reading, math and writing in 2016 was 393, 384 and 386 respectively.

1,389 students at Banneker, Creekside, Langston Hughes, Tri-Cities and Westlake high schools took the traditional SAT in 2016.

The traditional Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is an exam used by most colleges and universities in determining admission. 2400 is the maximum score a student can achieve on the traditional SAT.

The SAT was redesigned in 2016 to make it more straightforward and connected to classroom learning. Some of the changes reflected in the new SAT include removing the guessing penalty, focusing on words students will use in college and careers, and making the essay optional. College Board is not reporting school or district results to the state for the new SAT due to the number of students who participated.

25 September 2016

Absentee Ballot Requests in Republican Districts Outpace Democrats

Absentee ballot numbers released by Secretary of State Brian Kemp contain some good news for Georgia Republicans.

74% of all absentee ballots mailed to voters, last week, went to traditional GOP strongholds.

A total of 83,176 absentee ballots were sent from local elections office across the state. 62,142 went to the ten congressional districts represented by Republicans.

The 6th Congressional District lead the way with 10,464 absentee ballot requests.

House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price (R - Georgia) represents the 6th district, which includes the cities of Roswell, Johns Creek and Sandy Springs.

20 September marked the earliest day absentee ballots could be mailed to voters, according to state law. All absentee ballots must be received in the county elections office by 7PM on Election Day in order to be counted.

24 September 2016

Heavenly Harpist Tulani Successfully Blends Old School and New to Create Her Own Sound

Rashida Jolley, better known by her stage name Tulani, is an artist unlike any other.

The singer, songwriter and harpist could easily have followed her mother’s path into law school. In fact, that was her goal when she was a child.

(Singer, songwriter and harpist Rashida Tulani Jolley uses her fingers to pluck at the heartstrings of her listeners. Image courtesy East Coast Entertainment.)
Jolley says, “I wanted to be like my mom when I grew up. So I would always say, as a little girl, I want to be a lawyer like my mom.”

But the DC native decided to scrap the script and pursue her own passion . . . music.

“This is where my heart is, with the harp and singing,” the Nyack College graduate said. “I love to perform more than anything.”

Now, as Tulani prepares to release her latest album, Unscripted, she’s crafting a sound that breaks the mold of modern music, while also drawing inspiration from the past.

Tulani is an unabashed fan of music from the 60s, 70s and 80s. The 2001 Miss America contestant lists legends like Prince, James Brown, Michael Jackson, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston and Tina Turner as artists who influenced her.

Her producer, Geno Regist, advised the 2009 “America’s Got Talent” hopeful to be true to herself.

“You are a lover of that style of music,” Tulani recalls Geno telling her. “That’s who you are as an artist. That’s what you love. Turn what you love to do into what you do.”

The harp is not an instrument one typically associates with popular music. But again, Tulani doesn’t exactly follow the script.

16 September 2016

Australian DJ Tigerlily Discusses New Single, Suicide Prevention & Running the Peachtree Road Race

It's been five years since Dara Hayes revealed herself to the world as the DJ Tigerlily.

The Australian mix master has, since then, performed at some of the globe's biggest music festivals like Tomorrowland Belgium, Stereosonic Australia, Electric Zoo New York and once dropped a set in Malaysia before 30,000 screaming fans.

Tigerlily recently collaborated with American DJ KSHMR to produce a new single, "Invisible Children." The track is best described as a combination of Indian music featuring an added tribal element that makes for an extremely catchy sound.



"Invisible Children" by KSHMR & Tigerlily

Georgia Unfiltered caught up with Tigerlily for a quick Q&A session, where she talks about what inspired her DJ career as well as her charitable work that stemmed from personal battles in her own life.
(Australian DJ Tigerlily visits Atlanta for one night only at Opera, 16 September 2016. Image courtesy Tigerlily.)

Q: For people not familiar with you --this is your first trip to Atlanta I believe-- tell us a little about yourself. What prompted you to embark on a DJ career? What did your parents want you to be when you were growing up?

Tigerlily: Music has always been a big part of my life. I started playing piano, writing and singing at the age of 4 and continued to do this up until I finished high school. The transition into dance music was very organic. My parents have always been very supportive of me no matter what I do. As long as I am healthy and happy, then they are content and proud. I'm very lucky.

Q: You're from Australia, and so is Trance DJ MaRLo, but I can't seem to find any collaborations with the two of you. How would you feel about doing some work with MaRLo in the future?

Tigerlily: I really love and respect MaRLo as an artist and a human. He is incredible. I would love to work with him at some point if we could fuse our sounds and brands together in the right way.